Building Science, Master of Engineering, Full-time/Part-time – BCIT (2023)

1. Required Core Technical Courses (12.0 credits required): Credits BSCI 9000Building Science 1

Taking the interdisciplinary nature of the program and its diverse intake into account, this levelling course is designed to introduce the basic and advanced building science principles with a focus on heat, air, and moisture transfer in buildings. Topics include heat conduction, convection and radiation, psychrometric chart, airflow through building components due to combined forces, and moisture transport in air and porous materials including vapour diffusion, convection, and capillarity. The theory is illustrated through the application of analytical methods such as the thermal network in solving typical heat and mass transfer problems through building envelope components and heat and mass balance within buildings. Concepts such as surface heat and mass transfer coefficients, equivalent solar-air temperature, clear sky long-wave radiation, thermal and moisture storage, psychrometrics and condensation due to vapour and airflow are covered.
Prerequisite(s):

  • No prerequisites are required for this course.

course outline

3.0BSCI 9020Building Materials

This course provides advanced understanding of major building materials used in the construction industry. The course will discuss typical manufacturing and processing, structure, properties, embodied energy and greenhouse gas emissions, performance, end uses and maintenance requirements of each material. A term project evaluates the progress of materials related knowledge used in the built environment. The course will be split into the following topics: 1. Materials science, including the primary material classes, material properties, and testing. 2. Primary building materials - Wood; Stone; Cement and Concrete; Brick and Block; Ferrous Metals; Non-Ferrous Metals. 3. Secondary building materials - Board Materials; Plastics and Fabrics; Insulation Materials; Composite Materials; Glass and Structural Glazing; Sealing Materials; Coatings and Finishes; Membranes; Fire and Smoke Resistant Materials; Sustainable Materials; New and Innovative Building Materials. 4. Building material case study. The course will enable the student to select and specify appropriate materials and testing for use on buildings. In addition, the student will be able to assess the condition of building materials, propose possible causes of deterioration, evaluate if maintenance is required, and plan remediation.
Prerequisite(s):

  • No prerequisites are required for this course.

course outline

3.0BSCI 9120Building Envelope 1

​Building Envelope 1 addresses the design and performance of building envelope assemblies with a focus on above grade assemblies including walls, roofs, doors and fenestration assemblies. By the end of the course, the students will have developed a good knowledge of the theoretical and practical aspects of the design and the likely performance of the whole Building Envelope. Topics include: The definitions and functions of building envelope assemblies and how they affect and are affected by the function and performance of a building as a whole. An overview of materials and methods commonly used in the construction of building envelope assemblies in Canada with some reference to other locations and climates. The driving forces and mechanisms to control heat flow, air leakage, rain penetration and moisture transport by vapour diffusion and capillary action including an introduction to the use of computer-based thermal and hygrothermal analysis tools (e.g. THERM and WUFI). Designing walls, roofs, door and fenestration assemblies for durability with due consideration of hygrothermal loads such as rain penetration, heat loss, vapour diffusion, air leakage, and condensation, material properties, damage functions that affect building envelope assemblies and how to minimize degradation by design and material selection. Methods to analyze thermal bridging at 2D and 3D building envelope details. Overview of the requirements of the applicable Building Codes and Standards (National Building Code of Canada, British Columbia Building Code, Vancouver Building By-Law, Ashrae 90.1, etc.) with respect to building envelope performance and durability. 2D and 3D building envelope details pertaining to moisture, air, and heat management, with the specific focus on the "continuity" of the building envelope control layers (rain penetration control, thermal insulation, air barrier, and vapour retarder/barrier) within building envelope assemblies and at transitions to adjacent assemblies.
Prerequisite(s):

  • 60% in BSCI 9000 and 60% in BSCI 9020

course outline

3.0BSCI 9130Building Energy Performance

The course is presented as lectures and assignments, with a term project to be conducted in parallel with lectures. The course is broken into seven segments: 1. Building Thermal Demand Analysis – heating and cooling loads (includes envelope transmission losses and gains, solar gains, internal gains, lighting and appliance loads, and climatic and operating considerations). 2. Passive Solar Design Concepts in Building Application – solar heating and cooling, thermal mass, natural ventilation, daylighting, building orientation. 3. Building HVAC System – various types of heating, cooling and ventilation system and components. 4. Energy-efficiency Measures – high-efficient building mechanical, service hot water and lighting systems, improved envelope thermal properties, smart energy management and control. 5. Whole-Building Energy Models – simulation of building thermal behaviors and energy system performance characteristics. 6. Analysis of Simulation Results – building energy profiles and drivers, GHG emissions reduction opportunities analyses, simple and complex payback, life-cycle costing and present-value analyses. 7. Regulatory and Voluntary Programs – BC Energy Step Code, ASHRAE 90.1 and 90.2, Model National Energy Codes, LEED, CBIP. Each week's lesson includes a two-hour lecture session, and a one-hour lab session. In addition, a bi-weekly preparatory session of active learning (reflection of key readings) will be scheduled.
Prerequisite(s):

  • (60% in BSCI 9000 and 60% in BSCI 9120) or 50% in BLDC 3050 ( may be taken concurrently)

course outline

(Video) Building Science Info Session 2018
3.0 2. Technical Electives:
  • Path 1: 18.0 credits required
  • Path 2: 9.0 credits required
Credits

Complete either six (Path 1) or three (Path 2) courses from the following list of technical electives.

Upon Graduate Program Director approval, you may select one course (3.0 credits) from outside of the program.

BSCI 9050Research Methods

This course introduces the principles, procedures, and ethics that are fundamental to scientific research. Through a modular approach, this course will introduce the following qualitative and quantitative research methodologies: surveys, experimental, field data, case studies, and numerical. Topics within each module will include scientific approaches for developing research design including literature review, data gathering, measurement strategies and the use of analytical software, statistical analysis of data, and presentation of findings. Various information resources relevant to the building science field will be explored including database searches, journal publications, conference papers, and other technical publications. After taking this course, students will be expected to understand the structure of scientific research as well as critically compare and contrast the different research methodologies with other students in the course. Students will also be expected to communicate their findings clearly and concisely through written assignments, a research report, and class presentations.
Prerequisite(s):

  • No prerequisites are required for this course.

course outline

3.0BSCI 9060Building Science Acoustics

The field of acoustics as a building science includes the application of theoretical principles, the use of standardized professional measurement and execution of numerical and software modelling of sound in indoor and outdoor building environments. Discussions and research in sound propagation, sound absorption, materials, transmission, and speech intelligibility parameters examines sound quality and noise mitigation strategies in buildings. Acoustical performance criteria for the interior and exterior environments, as defined in policies and current green building design and rating systems, provide the context for integrating acoustics into mechanical and energy system design and building envelope design. The course concludes with applications of psychoacoustics in the built environment as a merging acoustic field.
Prerequisite(s):

  • No prerequisites are required for this course.

course outline

3.0BSCI 9090Directed Studies

The Directed Study course aims to provide students the opportunity to undertake supervised elements of study that are not offered elsewhere across the Institute, UBC, SFU or another post-secondary institute. While students are expected to select courses whenever possible from the available structured academic offerings, students may pursue through directed study a complementary course that has a supportive focus to the curriculum within the Building Science Graduate Program. The directed study course is structured to allow pursuit of a well-formulated and synthesised study plan. The course may be completed individually or with more than one student. The directed study course is separate from the Research Thesis (BSCI 9850) or Research Project (BSCI 9755) and should not constitute a part of the final thesis or project submission. The student must submit a Directed Studies Approval Form (See Graduate Student Handbook). The Directed Studies Approval Form outlines the statement of intent, objectives, milestones and schedule and includes a supporting bibliography. The form is to be signed by the student’s Supervisor and Program Director prior to the student's eligibility to register for this elective. The student works under the direction of their Supervisor or other BCIT faculty approved by the Supervisor. Student and Supervisor shall meet as required.
Prerequisite(s):

  • With completion of the Directed Studies Approval Form and the Supervisor's and Building Science Graduate Program Director’s Approval.

course outline

(Video) 2.3 Renovation projects. The process, challenges and lessons learned.

3.0BSCI 9100Building Environment and Climate

The course provides advanced understanding of the physical and environmental interconnections between the building and the local urban environment in the context of the local climate, while considering humans as integral receivers and enablers of the built environment. Topics include, atmospheric circulations as affected by oceans and land, the large scale weather context for buildings and the influence of small scale circulations and local weather; local wind and solar radiation; urban heat island (UHI); thermal and water balances and effects in urban microclimates; building-urban green-house gas (GHG) mitigation; building-urban adaptation to climate change; adaptive human comfort and environmental health; and human responses and adaptations to the built environment. Students will conduct measurements on the built environment, analyze environmental data, and build mathematical models to simulate strategies and systems to achieve more interconnected and sustainable built environments.
Prerequisite(s):

  • 60% in BSCI 9000

course outline

3.0BSCI 9150Mechanical Systems and Control

This elective course will benefit students who want to develop knowledge, and the principles of heating, ventilating, air-conditioning and refrigeration systems and their roles in building applications. It also helps students to have a more comprehensive understanding of mechanical system’s role in improving building energy efficiency and reducing the associated GHG emissions. Topics include the theory and practice of all-air air-conditioning systems, all-water air-conditioning systems, air-water combination air-conditioning systems, heating and cooling load calculations, psychrometric analysis, and building automation systems. For each type of these systems, design procedures and operating theories will be introduced and their features will be addressed, along with the concepts of control. The course will review the code compliant minimum energy efficiency requirements of key components in HVAC system as well. In addition, some innovative concepts including the passive and energy recovery technologies which can potentially be incorporated into the conventional HVAC system design will be discussed in terms of their technical, economic, and environmental applicability. This course is presented as lectures and assignments. Students will be assigned a term project relevant to course content and submit the report by the end of the class. Students will also be asked to present their project in class. In addition, a bi-weekly preparatory session of active learning (reflection of key readings) will be scheduled.
Prerequisite(s):

  • 60% in BSCI 9000 ( may be taken concurrently)

course outline

3.0BSCI 9170Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality

This course introduces students to the most important indoor air contaminants and their respective emission sources, including building materials, occupants and their activities, and outdoor air pollution. Students will learn how to measure typical indoor air contaminants and assess their impact on the built environment and health. Strategies to assess and improve IAQ, by building material selection, modelling pollutant emissions and dispersal, field and laboratory measurements, and ventilation systems are addressed. The course introduces ventilation systems and ventilation strategies to maintain satisfactory indoor air quality in buildings.
Prerequisite(s):

  • 60% in BSCI 9000

course outline

3.0BSCI 9220Building Envelope 2

In the Building Envelope 1 course, the design and performance of above grade envelope assemblies were covered. In the Building Envelope 2 course, below grade assemblies including basements, crawlspaces, parkades, podium waterproofing, foundation walls, and slabs on grade and slabs below grade, will be addressed. The course will pivot to more advanced application of the theoretical and practical aspects of building envelope design. This will include design review of proprietary building envelope assemblies, establishing effective thermal performance of complex buildings and building envelope condition assessments and forensics. Case studies will be used to develop the student's abilities to make and communicate engineering judgements. Topics include: Below grade assemblies including walls, floor, and roof assemblies separating both heated and unheated spaces from the ground. Design and performance aspects with respect to the control of surface water, ground water, heat loss, vapour diffusion, air leakage, condensation, as well as improving long term durability of the assemblies. Overview of Building Codes applied to below-grade assemblies 2D and 3D building envelope details of below grade assemblies. Assessing performance and risks of "proprietary" panelized envelope systems such as curtain wall, window wall, mass timber panels and precast concrete. This will include assessment of 2D and 3D building envelope details with the specific focus on the "continuity" of the building envelope control layers (rain penetration control, thermal insulation, air barrier, and vapour retarder/barrier). Design of high thermal performance envelopes including use of BC Hydro's Thermal Bridging Guide and other tools to assess and reduce the impact of thermal bridging in buildings. Building envelope condition assessment methods, common failure modes, and remedial strategies using case studies Innovations and research pertaining to building envelope assemblies and components with the focus on moisture, air, heat management, and durability.
Prerequisite(s):

  • 60% in BSCI 9120

course outline

(Video) BCIT 101 - Part-time Studies Info Session - May 31, 2022
3.0BSCI 9230Measurement and Verification

The purpose of measurement and verification (M&V) of buildings is to provide feedback to building owners, managers and design teams on the effectiveness of measures incorporated into the design and retrofit on the building annual energy use and cost. This course introduces the principles, procedures and benefits of measurement and verification to building professionals in order to enable them to usefully and efficiently incorporate measurement and verification into the building design and operation process. Students will gain a solid literacy in the science of measuring energy use of buildings and verifying the results of energy efficiency measure. Verifying energy savings is an important part of energy saving initiatives and provides developers, owners and financiers of projects assistance in quantifying the expected or measured return on investment. The course covers the International Performance Measurement & Verification Protocol (IPMVP), which is the most widely accepted protocol worldwide for savings verification. Students will learn how to design an M&V Strategy for their projects and to manage the savings and verification process for both internal and external reporting.
Prerequisite(s):

  • 60% in BSCI 9130 and 60% in BSCI 9150

course outline

3.0BSCI 9240Modelling of Heat and Mass Transfer in Buildings

Correct design of healthy and comfortable indoor environments, and of durable and sustainable building envelopes requires reliable assessments of the heat and mass transfer in buildings, building zones and/or building components: ventilation flows, thermal stratification, interior moisture buffering, interstitial condensation, driving rain absorption, etc. Since not all these problems can be solved analytically, numerical modeling is becoming more and more widespread. This course will lead to proficiency in the mathematical and numerical modeling of heat and mass transfer in buildings. As such, the course will give students the ability to reliably create and/or apply numerical models in the hygrothermal design of buildings, building zones and /or building components.
Prerequisite(s):

  • 60% in BSCI 9100 and 60% in BSCI 9120
3.0BSCI 9250Advanced Energy Simulation

The elective course is presented as lectures and assignments, with a term project to be conducted in parallel with lectures. It will benefit students who want to gain more in-depth knowledge of building energy performance simulation as well as the skills to use sophisticated simulation tools. Meanwhile, through the study, students will acquire a more comprehensive understanding of the most widely adopted building energy standard (e.g. BC Energy Step Code, ASHRAE90.1). This elective course is broken into four segments: 1. Engineering algorithms of software – including advanced knowledge of modelling software and heat transfer and thermodynamic algorithms related to building mechanical, electrical and plumbing (M.E.P.) systems. 2. Minimally-code compliant building modelling – ASHRAE 90.1 ECB and PRM modelling guidelines, ASHRAE 90.1 ECB and PRM baseline and proposed building design modelling. 3. BC Energy Step Code modelling – City of Vancouver Energy Modeling Guidelines, BC Energy Step Code requirements, GHG emission calculations. 4. Workarounds of selected innovative and/or complex building M.E.P. systems/components. Starting with commonly used computer building energy simulation tools and their features, student will apply principles and knowledge of building envelope, the building M.E.P. (Mechanical, Electrical and Plumbing) systems, the typical building energy simulation methods and building energy standard to more complicated building performance simulation models. Students will learn how to optimize various systems such as lighting, HVAC, and renewable energy systems for improved comfort and energy performance with consideration for the impact on life-cycle costs with the assistance of energy modelling software. Each week's lesson includes two hours and a half (2.5 hours) lecture session, and a one-hour (1.0 hour) lab session. In addition, a bi-weekly preparatory session of active learning (reflection of key readings) will be scheduled.
Prerequisite(s):

  • 60% in BSCI 9130 and 60% in BSCI 9150

course outline

3.0 3. Path 2 Research Courses (9.0 credits required): Credits BSCI 9050Research Methods

This course introduces the principles, procedures, and ethics that are fundamental to scientific research. Through a modular approach, this course will introduce the following qualitative and quantitative research methodologies: surveys, experimental, field data, case studies, and numerical. Topics within each module will include scientific approaches for developing research design including literature review, data gathering, measurement strategies and the use of analytical software, statistical analysis of data, and presentation of findings. Various information resources relevant to the building science field will be explored including database searches, journal publications, conference papers, and other technical publications. After taking this course, students will be expected to understand the structure of scientific research as well as critically compare and contrast the different research methodologies with other students in the course. Students will also be expected to communicate their findings clearly and concisely through written assignments, a research report, and class presentations.
Prerequisite(s):

(Video) 2022 03 02 Biomedical Engineering Technology

  • No prerequisites are required for this course.

course outline

3.0BSCI 9755Industry/Research Project

​Students are required to submit their research project as partial fulfillment of the Master of Engineering degree program requirements. Their research projects must demonstrate application of existing knowledge to solve new industry problems or advancement of knowledge in the chosen topic, as well as familiarity with methods of research and relevant literature in the chosen building science topic.
Prerequisite(s):

  • 60% in BSCI 9050 and 60% in BSCI 9120 and 60% in BSCI 9130

course outline

6.0 4. Graduate Seminar Courses (required but no credit given): Credits BSCI 9054Graduate Seminar Orientation

The course is a one two-hour session to orient students to the requirements of the Graduate Seminar series, BSCI 9055. The Graduate Seminar series is a required, non-credit course for graduation which will include invited experts from within and outside BCIT, and visits to construction sites and building materials manufacturing plants.
Prerequisite(s):

  • No prerequisites are required for this course.

course outline

BSCI 9055Graduate Seminar Series

The Graduate Seminar series is intended to expose students to current development and issues related to their fields of specialization. The seminar format will include invited experts from within and outside BCIT, and visits to construction sites and building materials manufacturing plants. The topics covered in this course are expected to widen students' professional outlooks and increase their efficiency in carrying out tasks. Possible topic areas include: construction processes, construction management including setting up contract agreements, quality assurance, regulatory affairs (including national and international standards), intellectual property, market assessment, risk assessment, professional skills (for example, teamwork, and conflict resolution), prototyping, product evaluation and testing, technology transfer, project management and time management. Students are also expected to communicate their research/project findings to their peers through oral presentations.
Prerequisite(s):

  • No prerequisites are required for this course.

course outline

Total Credits: 30.0

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